Your guide to the ACS national meeting in San Francisco | March 13, 2017 Issue - Vol. 95 Issue 11 | Chemical & Engineering News
Volume 95 Issue 11 | pp. 32-33
Issue Date: March 13, 2017

Your guide to the ACS national meeting in San Francisco

C&EN’s curated list of places to go, people to see, and science to learn
Department: Science & Technology
Keywords: ACS meeting news, #ACSSanFran, #ACSSF, materials science, symposia, Korean food, ALS research

Must-see presenters

* = Kavli speaker; ** = Plenary speaker
Click any speaker or symposium below to pull up a page with talk times and locations. You can even add them to your itinerary. To get ACS’s complete national meeting app click here. For a PDF of our guide to what’s hot in San Francisco, click here. To download the meeting app or view the technical program, visit the official #ACSSanFran website.

 
Bradley Olsen*
Materials maestro, MIT


Photo of Bradley Olsen of MIT.
 
Bradley Olsen*
Materials maestro, MIT


Jennifer Doudna*
Genome manipulator, UC Berkeley


Photo of Jennifer Doudna of UC Berkeley.
 
Jennifer Doudna*
Genome manipulator, UC Berkeley


Ann-Christine ­Albertsson**
Making sustainable polymeric materials, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Photo of Ann-Christine Albertsson of KTH Royal Institute of Techology
 
Ann-Christine ­Albertsson**
Making sustainable polymeric materials, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Jeffrey Linhardt**
Forget fingersticks. Verily Life Sciences researcher will present contact lenses that measure glucose in tears
Photo of Jeffrey Linhardt of Verily Life Sciences.
 
Jeffrey Linhardt**
Forget fingersticks. Verily Life Sciences researcher will present contact lenses that measure glucose in tears
Peter Green**
Cleaning up our energy act, National Renewable Energy Laboratory



Photo of Peter Green of National Renewable Energy Lab.
 
Peter Green**
Cleaning up our energy act, National Renewable Energy Laboratory



Keith Watson**
Making industry-academia partnerships work for both sides, Dow Chemical



Photo of Keith Watson of Dow Chemical.
 
Keith Watson**
Making industry-academia partnerships work for both sides, Dow Chemical



Natalie Franklin
Screening molecules without revealing structures protects collaborators’ IP, Eli Lilly & Co.


Photo of Natalie Franklin of Eli Lilly.
 
Natalie Franklin
Screening molecules without revealing structures protects collaborators’ IP, Eli Lilly & Co.


Darren Lipomi
When bonded to gloves, his thin-film sensors can detect a hand forming American Sign Language letters, UC San Diego


Photo of Darren Lipomi of UC San Diego.
 
Darren Lipomi
When bonded to gloves, his thin-film sensors can detect a hand forming American Sign Language letters, UC San Diego


Irene Groot
Imaging catalysts as they react, Leiden Institute of Chemistry




Photo of Irene Groot of Leiden Institute of Chemistry.
 
Irene Groot
Imaging catalysts as they react, Leiden Institute of Chemistry




Charles Sykes
His rotor molecules perform computations, Tufts






Photo of Charles Sykes of Tufts University.
 
Charles Sykes
His rotor molecules perform computations, Tufts






Kathleen Page
Yet another reason to cut down on fructose. It affects the brain differently than glucose does, U of Southern California

Photo of Kathleen Page of University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine.
 
Kathleen Page
Yet another reason to cut down on fructose. It affects the brain differently than glucose does, U of Southern California

Sechin Chang
USDA researcher describes milk protein casein’s flame-retardant properties





Photo of Sechin Chang of USDA Agricultural Research Service.
 
Sechin Chang
USDA researcher describes milk protein casein’s flame-retardant properties





Theresa Reineke
Polymer tailor, U of Minnesota
Photo of Theresa Reineke of University of Minnesota.
 
Theresa Reineke
Polymer tailor, U of Minnesota
Christina Smolke
Programming yeast to produce medicinal opioids, Stanford
Photo of Christina Smolke of Stanford.
 
Christina Smolke
Programming yeast to produce medicinal opioids, Stanford
Michael Johnson
Probing the neurochemistry of “chemo brain,” U of Kansas
Photo of Michael Johnson of University of Kansas.
 
Michael Johnson
Probing the neurochemistry of “chemo brain,” U of Kansas
Eranthie Weerapana
Her proteomic methods hunt down reactive cysteines, Boston College

Photo of Eranthie Weerapana of Boston College.
 
Eranthie Weerapana
Her proteomic methods hunt down reactive cysteines, Boston College

Martin Burke
Replacing missing ion-transport proteins with “molecular prosthetics,” UIUC
Photo of Martin Burke of UIUC.
 
Martin Burke
Replacing missing ion-transport proteins with “molecular prosthetics,” UIUC
Carol Robinson
Mass spec maven, Oxford



Photo of Carol Robinson of Oxford.
 
Carol Robinson
Mass spec maven, Oxford



Martin Thuo
Iowa State chemist recovers rare-earth metals from electronic waste, no dumpster diving involved. We think.
Photo of Martin Thuo of Iowa State University and Ames Lab.
 
Martin Thuo
Iowa State chemist recovers rare-earth metals from electronic waste, no dumpster diving involved. We think.
Wendy Young
Genentech VP will describe a potential lupus and rheumatoid arthritis treatment
Photo of Wendy Young of Genentech.
 
Wendy Young
Genentech VP will describe a potential lupus and rheumatoid arthritis treatment

Checking out the neighborhood

Some attractions nearby and farther afield that you might want to see while you’re in town.

1. Moscone Center: Your journey starts here.

2. Yerba Buena Gardens: This oasis in the city is also home to the Children’s Creativity Museum. Find your inner child.

3. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art: In case the museum’s 30,000 works of art aren’t enough, you can roam Klee and Calder exhibitions too.

4. Union Square: In the heart of the city’s shopping district, the central plaza is a great place to people watch.

5. Cable car turntable: Watch the famed cable cars change direction and then catch a ride to Chinatown.

6. W San Francisco (hotel)

9. Fisherman’s Wharf: This waterfront neighborhood is home to Ghirardelli Square, a decommissioned World War II-era submarine, and a sea lion colony.

10. Exploratorium: If you stay till Thursday evening, you can check out this interactive science museum without competition from kids.

11. Golden Gate Park: With the California Academy of Sciences and its aquarium, the de Young art museum, and multiple gardens, there’s something here for everyone.

The pick of the program

Too bad there’s no DVR for symposia. Here are some you should try to catch. 

Chemistry of Korean Food & Beverages

Sunday all day

Can‛t make it out for lunch? Get a vicarious kimchi fix instead.

Chemical Forensics

Monday & Tuesday all day

Pull up a chair, amateur detectives. A session on chemical weapons kicks off the symposium.

Startup Road: BayBio and Beyond

Sunday PM & Monday all day

Can you see them circling? This showcase of startups kicks off Sunday afternoon with the biotech version of “Shark Tank”.

Sunlight-Driven Processes: Exposing the Mechanisms Underlying Productive Photoactivities

Starts Sunday

This weeklong symposium runs the photochemistry gamut from photosynthesis to vision to excited-state dynamics.

Drug Discovery for ALS: Putting the Ice Bucket to Work

Tuesday PM

Come learn about recent advances in ALS research. We promise you won‛t get an ice bath.

What Have We Learned & Where Are We Going: Post-Settlement in the University of California

Wednesday all day

Hear about the progress that‛s been made in developing a safety culture on the UC campuses.

Hollyweird Chemistry

Sunday PM & Monday all day

Producers and consultants for TV and film talk about getting the science right in popular entertainment.

 
 

To download a pdf of the final program for the spring 2017 ACS National Meeting in San Francisco, April 2–6, visit http://cenm.ag/sa2017.


CORRECTION: This meeting guide was updated on March 22, 2017, to correct the description of the “Chemistry of Korean Food & Beverages” symposium. It was intended to imply that if you can’t make it out to lunch anywhere—Chinatown, Fisherman’s Wharf, etc.—you could get a vicarious food fix instead, by learning about the science of kimchi.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
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Comments
Josef (March 17, 2017 11:27 AM)
Where is the full program?
Joel Baechle (April 6, 2017 2:29 AM)
I drove in on Tuesday from the Sacramento area, and there was so much construction, especially plywood barricades, that you couldn't even identify buildings from the street. This guide commented on here is a PR piece, but my guess was that they outsourced it. I was at the meeting two years ago, and I thought I knew how to get in, but the lack of signage, assuming "everyone" was using their phone made it extremely difficult for me - not a good experience at all. When buildings are massive and can't be seen close up due to obstructions, some kind of signage is needed. I don't have Wi-Fi where I work, and it is pointless to have internet access on my phone - there is none.
dean (March 17, 2017 2:23 PM)
This website layout is very annoying! I prefer a real computer, not a smartphone. Everything is linear, no table of contents, and forced to manually scroll through everything. What a waste of time - either smartphone or pc! Why not have your html code detect whether smartphone or pc and which operating system? Then it could deliver a proper page.

Plus, I did NOT find what the email said I would - the final program!! Where IS that pdf document available to download??
eric (March 17, 2017 5:00 PM)
Full agreement with Dean (3/17 2:33).
An e-mail is sent out saying full program available yet instead you get a long PR scroll.
Anyone who clicks on a link saying program for an ACS meeting is already into the science and does not need cute comments (e.g., 'maven').
David Ross (March 18, 2017 12:18 PM)
Where is the final program??
Dmitry Karshtedt (March 19, 2017 12:14 PM)
I don't understand what Chinatown has to do with kimchi. Chinese and Korean foods are very different.
Herman Rutner, emeritus (March 19, 2017 4:34 PM)
I agree with Dean. Your final program is a S F flyer of tourist attractions with limited program contents lacking full meeting pdf when opened on my PC.
Waste of time looking for real info for me, not attending the meeting.
HR
laurenkwolf (March 20, 2017 8:27 AM)
Hi all,
Apologies to you if you got here and were looking for a final program. I'm not sure what e-mail sent you here, but it clearly promised something that this meeting guide is not. This is a curated meeting guide: C&EN culled the program and got advice from experts and program chairs to put it together. As it says at the top, "It's a curated list of things to do, people to see, and science to learn." If you're looking for the final program in C&EN, it's here: http://cen.acs.org/content/dam/cen/95/11/09511-meetings-final3.pdf And if you're looking for the technical program, it's here: https://ep70.eventpilot.us/web/page.php?page=Home&project=ACS17SPRING Hope this helps. And have a great time at the meeting.
Robert Long (March 20, 2017 10:52 AM)
This is the email sent from meetingsnews@acs.org:

253rd American Chemical Society
National Meeting & Exposition
Advanced Materials, Technologies, Systems & Processes
Your Guide for the ACS National Meeting Is Here!
The full program for the 253rd ACS National Meeting & Expo is now available in the latest issue of C&EN. This guides consist of C&EN's curated list of places to visit in San Francisco, must-see presenters, and recommended programming, including "Hollyweird Chemistry" and "Drug Discovery for ALS: Putting the Ice Bucket to Work."
VIEW FULL PROGRAM

The links go to this website (which is NOT the Full program).
David Ross (March 21, 2017 5:10 PM)
The suggested routes to the final technical program did not lead to the program, least in my hands. So once again: How do I get to the final technical program??
laurenkwolf (March 27, 2017 8:57 AM)
Sorry for all the trouble, David. I double-checked the link to the Technical Program that I listed. It works for me. But perhaps it's browser-dependent? I'm using Chrome. Short of that, here's the main website for the San Francisco meeting: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/meetings/spring-2017.html
If you scroll down, you'll see a link labeled "Technical Program" under "Program."
Robert: We've sent a message to ACS's meetings division asking them to correct this error in future e-mails.
Medicharla V. Jagannadham (March 30, 2017 12:32 AM)
Complete program details along with the talks, details on Who is chairing the session,parallel sessions with locations will help to finalize our program. I hope by this time all the talks would have been finalized. Provide these details in a PDF form to all the attendees.
E-mail: jagan@ccmb.res.in
bruce (March 30, 2017 3:09 PM)
No, not Fisherman's Wharf! Please, ACS, don't send people there. San Franciscans view Fisherman's Wharf as a tourist trap embarrassment. Jeez, just send them to the Golden Gate bridge.
William Goddard (March 31, 2017 6:41 PM)
I find the current system extremely cumbersome
All I want to do is to download a pdf of the full technical session so that I can print the pages for the sessions I want to attend.
I like to see all the talks of a session together as I skip between sessions.
I have tried all the the instructions above to try to download this pdf, all unsuccessvul

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