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June 26, 2017 | A version of this story appeared in Volume 95, Issue 26

 

Letters to the Editor

Chemistry stamps

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Credit: Dan Rabinovich
Credit: Dan Rabinovich

In addition to the upcoming solar eclipse stamp being issued by the U.S. Postal Service (C&EN, June 5, page 40), several other countries have released stamps printed with thermochromic ink. Of particular interest to readers of C&EN may be the buckminsterfullerene stamp issued in Great Britain in 2001 to honor the centennial of the Nobel Prizes. Gentle warming of the stamp’s surface reveals the presence of a black sphere (presumably a noble gas or metal atom) inside the molecule of C60: an endohedral fullerene!

Dan Rabinovich
Charlotte, N.C.


Corrections:

June 19, page 8: A production error led to a page from the Jan. 9 issue printing in place of the correct page of science concentrates from the June 19 issue. Read the stories missing from the June 19 print edition online at cenm.ag/solarcolors and cenm.ag/fdaopioid.

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