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Periodic graphics: The chemistry of frozen desserts

Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning samples the science behind ice cream and other icy treats

by Andy Brunning
July 12, 2017 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 95, ISSUE 29

 

To download a pdf of this article, visit cenm.ag/frozentreats1.


References used to create this graphic:


To see more of Brunning’s work, go to compoundchem.com. To see all of C&EN’s Periodic Graphics, visit cenm.ag/periodicgraphics.


This article has been translated into Spanish by Divulgame.org and can be found here.

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Comments
William Winter (July 12, 2017 10:14 PM)
Years ago, in the 1970's, I had the good fortune to spend some time with , now Sir, Dai Rees, then a manager at Unilever Research, and his group in the Colworth lab outside of Bedford, UK. One of their foci was ice cream. In a conversation that I suspect he did not intend to be memorialized, Dai made the following comment. 'Processed foods have two main components. The firt is air, the second is water. Everything else is packaging!'
William Winter (July 12, 2017 10:16 PM)
Years ago, in the 1970's, I had the good fortune to spend some time with , now Sir, Dai Rees, then a manager at Unilever Research, and his group in the Colworth lab outside of Bedford, UK. One of their foci was ice cream. In a conversation that I suspect he did not intend to be memorialized, Dai made the following comment. 'Processed foods have two main components. The firt is air, the second is water. Everything else is packaging!'
William Winter (July 12, 2017 10:19 PM)

Years ago, in the 1970's, I had the good fortune to spend some time with , now Sir, Dai Rees, then a manager at Unilever Research, and his group in the Colworth lab outside of Bedford, UK. One of their foci was ice cream. In a conversation that I suspect he did not intend to be memorialized, Dai made the following comment. 'Processed foods have two main components. The first is air, the second is water. Everything else is packaging!'
G (July 14, 2017 6:39 PM)
Great graphic!

I look forward to an addendum with frozen custard / french style ice cream (cream + egg + sugar).
thomas (July 17, 2017 11:48 AM)
yeah how could they forget the original: custard
Andy Brunning (July 18, 2017 2:56 PM)
Since it's not included in the graphic, here's some more info on frozen custard: it contains around 10% milk fat, and has an overrun of 15-30%.
Esmeralda Garcia (February 19, 2018 8:59 PM)
I find it so interesting that air bubbles are a great factor in ice cream making. I learned the difference between each frozen dessert scientifically and what makes each frozen dessert special. I also learned about bonding between hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen which are really important in the composition of ice cream.

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