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Atmospheric Chemistry

Periodic graphics: The chemistry of air-conditioning

Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning explains how refrigerants help keep us cool on hot summer days

by Andy Brunning
August 14, 2017 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 95, ISSUE 33

 

 

To download a pdf of this article, visit http://cenm.ag/air-conditioning.


References used to create this graphic:

A brief history of air conditioning

A history of air conditioning

Refrigerants for residential and commercial air conditioning units

R-32, a next generation refrigerant

Replacing the replacements

How air conditioners work

HFC phase-out agreed at Montreal Protocol meeting


A collaboration between C&EN and Andy Brunning, author of the popular graphics blog Compound Interest.

To see more of Brunning’s work, go to compoundchem.com. To see all of C&EN’s Periodic Graphics, visit http://cenm.ag/periodicgraphics.

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Comments
Ivan Vince (August 16, 2017 6:03 PM)
Surprised to see no mention of the HC R290 (propane) as a rapidly emerging substitute for HFCs and HFOs in air conditioning.
Jase Davidson (September 27, 2017 3:29 PM)
Great information! I think that AC is misunderstood and knowing how it works will save you money and time in the long run. Thanks for sharing!

J. Davidson

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