Volume 95 Issue 8 | p. 4 | Letters
Issue Date: February 20, 2017

Keep up the objective reporting

Department: Letters
Keywords: letters

I have been an ACS member for over 10 years and thoroughly enjoy reading C&EN. I have a Ph.D. in biochemistry and an interest in politics. I have always appreciated the manner in which C&EN reports on political issues by focusing on the science and the facts.

I am also a strong Donald J. Trump supporter. In the current media climate, I was happy to see that the Jan. 16 issue kept with C&EN’s tradition of objective reporting (C&EN, Jan. 16, page 24). I assume that many journalists do not support the current President and likely enjoy writing hit pieces or treating our President unfairly.

I just wanted to let you know that I appreciate the objective reporting of C&EN and that there are well-educated Trump supporters who read your magazine. Keep up the good work!

Chris Spedaliere
Malvern, Pa.


Corrections:

Jan. 30, page 27: The feature story about China’s investments in new light sources incorrectly described a field served by synchrotrons as condensed metaphysics. The field is condensed matter physics.

Feb. 13, page 28: The cover story about the challenge of delivering CRISPR inside the body incorrectly stated that Casebia Therapeutics is a joint venture between Novartis and CRISPR Therapeutics. It is a joint venture between Bayer and CRISPR Therapeutics.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society
Comments
Robert E Buntrock (Tue Feb 28 15:52:23 EST 2017)
Chris Spedaliere: The articles cited are indeed for the most part politically neutral. They also show how many of Trump's stands and proposals could be counter-productive to chemists and the chemical industry, especially in re the positive trade balance for US produced chemicals and the possibility of crippling retaliation in general by trading partners. Simplistic attacks on regulation including on the EPA are also disturbing. Does you support of Trump include these policies? In addition, those who do not like Trump, his speeches and promises, and his policies do not necessarily write "hit pieces" on Trump but usually in reporting depend on Trump's own words and the text of policies and point out fallacies or "alternative facts" in analysis.

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment