ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Policy

California lists vinylidene chloride as a carcinogen under Prop 65

by Cheryl Hogue
January 15, 2018 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 96, ISSUE 3

California has listed vinylidene chloride as a carcinogen. Also known as 1,1-dichloroethene, the chemical is used to make polymers, including flexible film food wraps, as well as fibers and adhesives, according to the federal Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) last year listed vinylidene chloride as “possibly carcinogenic to humans.” California requires that chemicals deemed to be carcinogens by IARC be listed under the state’s Proposition 65, a 1986 statute that requires warning labels on products containing substances that cause cancer, birth defects, or reproductive problems. The state has proposed setting a no-significant-risk level for vinylidene chloride of 0.88 µg per day, which would require manufacturers and retailers to label only products that expose people to greater amounts of the substance.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment