ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Safety

Better occupational health surveillance system needed in U.S., National Academies report says

by Andrea Widener
January 22, 2018 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 96, ISSUE 4

The U.S. should invest in a more robust occupational health and safety surveillance system to help understand and prevent workplace injuries, illnesses, and deaths, a new National Academies of Sciences, Engineering & Medicine report says. The current system, which is fragmented among several federal agencies and states, undercounts workplace illnesses and injuries and their costs. Among the recommendations, the report suggests improved monitoring of hazards and exposures in the workplace that can lead to acute and chronic diseases. Currently, federal and state agencies collect little data about chemical and other workplace exposures, which makes risks hard to identify and prevent. The report also recommends a household survey that would fill in data gaps about injuries to self-employed, contract, and small-farm workers. “We are experiencing rapid changes in the nature of work, and with new risks developing, the nation is in dire need of a smarter surveillance system that tracks occupational injuries, illnesses, and exposures,” says study chair Edward Shortliffe of Arizona State University.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment