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Environment

How some crabs avoid being eaten

Newly identified molecules in predator urine send mud crabs scuttling

by Kerri Jansen
January 19, 2018 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 96, ISSUE 4

Credit: Georgia Tech/PNAS/C&EN
 

Waterways are a mess of molecules, presenting a massive challenge for researchers trying to understand how marine life communicates chemically. But with an assist from analytical chemistry, researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology have now solved an underwater mystery: what chemical cues mud crabs use to avoid predatory blue crabs (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2018, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1713901115).

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