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Materials

Liquid metal electrode makes superstretchy nanogenerator

Device harvests energy from human motion with help of gallium, indium, and tin alloy

by Kerri Jansen
February 23, 2018 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 96, ISSUE 9

Credit: ACS Nano/C&EN
 

Wearable electronics such as activity trackers and biometric sensors demand power sources that can bend and flex as the body moves. A team at Soochow University has developed a triboelectric nanogenerator—which scavenges energy from static electricity produced during motion—using an electrode made from a liquid gallium, indium, and tin alloy. The device retains its function even when bent in half or stretched to three times its length (ACS Nano 2018, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.8b00147).

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