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Searle Scholars Announced

May 30, 2005 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 83, ISSUE 22

Fifteen scientists working in the chemical and biological sciences have been made 2005 Searle Scholars and will each receive $240,000 in research support during the next three years. The scholars were selected from a field of 193 applicants from 122 universities and research institutions; applicants were chosen for conducting innovative research with the potential for making significant contributions to biological research over an extended period of time. With this class, a total of 393 scholars will have shared nearly $70 million in grants since the program began in 1981.

The recipients are the following: Phil S. Baran, assistant professor of chemistry at Scripps Research Institute; Emily H. Y. Cheng, assistant professor of internal medicine and pathology and immunology at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis; Aaron R. Dinner, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Chicago; Nicole J. Francis, assistant professor of molecular and cellular biology at Harvard University; Eileen A. Hebets, assistant professor in the department of environmental science, policy, and management, division of insect biology, at the University of California, Berkeley; Melissa S. Jurica, assistant professor of molecular, cell, and developmental biology at UC Santa Cruz; John D. MacMicking, assistant professor of microbial pathogenesis at Yale School of Medicine; Harmit S. Malik, assistant member of the division of basic sciences at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle; Wallace F. Marshall, assistant professor of biochemistry and biophysics at UC San Francisco; Kang Shen assistant professor in Stanford University's department of biological sciences; Toshiyasu Taniguchi, assistant member of the divisions of human biology and public health sciences at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Antoine M. Van Oijen, assistant professor of biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology at Harvard Medical School; Jing W. Wang, assistant professor of biology at UC San Diego; Wade C. Winkler, assistant professor of biochemistry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas; and Li I. Zhang, assistant professor of physiology and biophysics at the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine.

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