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Materials

Chemistry in Pictures: Rainbow deposition

by Kerri Jansen
October 16, 2019

20191017lnp20-rainbow.jpg
Credit: Joel Schneider

Atomically thin layers of aluminum oxide, iron oxide, and nickel oxide create colorful patterns on the tray that Joel Schneider, a PhD candidate in chemical engineering at Stanford University, uses to hold samples during atomic layer deposition (ALD). Joel is studying the chemical reactions that take place during ALD, a technique used in the semiconductor industry and in nanofabrication. Although he uses a new substrate in each deposition, the holder remains inside the chamber every time and gradually accumulates layers from each deposition performed. The multiple thin layers create interference patterns, resulting in this colorful display.

Submitted by Joel Schneider

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