ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Nanomaterials

Chemistry in Pictures: Lycurgus cup

by Craig Bettenhausen
February 28, 2019

Dichroic materials transmit one color of light and reflect a different color. The famous Lycurgus cup, a 4th-century Roman relic currently in the British Museum, looks green when lit from the same side as the viewer and red when backlit. Researchers at Wageningen University have now replicated the effect in 3-D-printed plastic, using basically the same materials science. Both achieve the unusual optical feat using a suspension of metallic nanoparticles. The Roman cup consists of gold and silver nanoparticles suspended in glass, while the modern one uses just gold particles in poly(vinyl alcohol). The results could have applications in optics, microscopy, and nanotechnology as well as in the arts, the researchers say.

Read the paper: Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2019, DOI: 10.3762/bjnano.10.43.

Credit: Vittorio Saggiomo

Do science. Take pictures. Win money. Enter our photo contest here.

Related C&EN Content:

Sulfur-based polymer transmits long-wavelength infrared better than any other known plastic

Analysis reveals why some yellow paint in Picasso’s Femme has faded to brown

Chemistry in Pictures: C’est magnifique!

.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment