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Synthesis

Chemistry in Pictures: Audio oxidation

by Craig Bettenhausen
August 25, 2020

 

Credit: Ilha Hwang, Rahul Dev Mukhopadhyay, Kimoon Kim/Nat. Chem. 2020 DOI: 10.1038/s41557-020-0516-2

The energy to get a chemical reaction going can come from a number of sources. Ilha Hwang and Rahul Dev Mukhopadhyay are exploring the use of a phat beat. Members of Kimoon Kim's group at Korea's Institute for Basic Science, they placed a dish containing a water (or aqueous) solution of reduced methyl viologen, which is blue, dissolved in water on an audio speaker. In the presence of air, the solution turns colorless as oxygen dissolves and oxidizes the methyl viologen. When the team played a 40 Hz tone, a deep booming bass note, the reaction proceeded faster in certain parts of the standing wave that the audio tone produced in water. The team hopes their research will open up new ways to control and visualize chemical reactions. This video is sped up to 80x normal speed.

Submitted by Ilha Hwang, Rahul Dev Mukhopadhyay, Kimoon Kim/Nat. Chem. 2020 DOI: 10.1038/s41557-020-0516-2

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