Small Molecule Inhibits Specialized Form Of Cell Death | Chemical & Engineering News
Volume 90 Issue 5 | p. 40 | Concentrates
Issue Date: January 30, 2012

Small Molecule Inhibits Specialized Form Of Cell Death

Chemical genetics screening study identifies a small-molecule inhibitor for programmed cell death
Department: Science & Technology
News Channels: Biological SCENE
Keywords: necroptosis, necrosis, necrosulfonamide
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NEW COMPONENT
Chinese scientists find that MLKL participates in the necroptosis pathway, which is activated by binding of two other proteins, RIP1 and RIP3, and phosphorylation (P) of key residues.
Graphic of MLKL protein binding with two other proteins, RIP1 and RIP3.
 
NEW COMPONENT
Chinese scientists find that MLKL participates in the necroptosis pathway, which is activated by binding of two other proteins, RIP1 and RIP3, and phosphorylation (P) of key residues.

A chemical genetics study has identified a small-molecule inhibitor for a specialized programmed cell death process and revealed a previously unknown molecular component in the pathway that controls the process. Necroptosis—a form of necrosis, or cell death from extracellular causes such as infection and tissue damage—is controlled by a cellular signaling pathway. The pathway plays important roles in a variety of life processes, including development, response to tissue damage, and immune reactions to viruses. Xiaoguang Lei and Xiaodong Wang of China’s National Institute of Biological Sciences and coworkers used high-throughput chemical screening to identify necrosulfonamide as a compound that blocks necroptosis (Cell, DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2011.11.031). Signaling molecules in the necroptosis pathway were previously known to include receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinases 1 and 3 (RIP1 and RIP3), but the target of necrosulfonamide turns out to be mixed-lineage kinase domainlike protein (MLKL). The study thus reveals MLKL to be a critical component of the necroptosis pathway, which was not known before. Necrosulfonamide “will be a very useful chemical probe for further biological studies,” Lei says.

 
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ISSN 0009-2347
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