FDA Approves Genetically Modified Apple And Potato | March 30, 2015 Issue - Vol. 93 Issue 13 | Chemical & Engineering News
Volume 93 Issue 13 | p. 8 | News of The Week
Issue Date: March 30, 2015 | Web Date: March 26, 2015

FDA Approves Genetically Modified Apple And Potato

Food: Agency says engineered versions are as safe and nutritious as conventional counterparts
Department: Government & Policy
News Channels: Biological SCENE
Keywords: genetically modified organisms, FDA
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Arctic apples (right) are genetically modified to produce low levels of the enzyme that causes the fruit’s flesh to turn brown.
Credit: Okanagan Specialty Fruits
Two apples with slices cut out of them. On the left, brown spots have formed. On the right, no brown spots are evident.
 
Arctic apples (right) are genetically modified to produce low levels of the enzyme that causes the fruit’s flesh to turn brown.
Credit: Okanagan Specialty Fruits
[+]Enlarge
Innate potatoes are bioengineered to form less acrylamide than conventional spuds when fried.
Credit: Shutterstock
Photo of french fries.
 
Innate potatoes are bioengineered to form less acrylamide than conventional spuds when fried.
Credit: Shutterstock

The Food & Drug Administration has cleared the way for two genetically modified crops to hit the U.S. market—apples that resist browning and potatoes that produce less of the carcinogen acrylamide at high temperatures. The agency declared on March 20 that the crops are just as nutritious and safe as conventional apples and potatoes.

The crops are controversial because they rely on a process called gene silencing, or RNA interference (RNAi). Although there is no evidence to suggest the products will pose a health or safety risk to humans or the environment, some consumer advocacy groups are raising concerns about the approval process.

The modified apples were developed by Canada-based Okanagan Specialty Fruits under the name Arctic apples. This fruit contains added apple genes that code for an enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), that causes apple flesh to turn brown. The extra genes trigger RNAi, which inhibits expression of all genes that produce PPO.

In Innate potatoes, developed by Idaho-based J. R. Simplot, gene silencing reduces the amounts of the amino acid asparagine and of reducing sugars in the spuds. At high temperatures, such as those used in frying, asparagine reacts with the sugars to form acrylamide, which has been shown to be carcinogenic in animal studies.

FDA’s approval of the two crops spurred a coalition of advocacy groups to send letters to fast-food restaurants, urging them not to sell the modified apples and potatoes. The coalition warns of potential environmental, health, and economic risks associated with the products. They also raise concerns that the products won’t be labeled as containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs), saying that consumers have the right to know.

Public confidence in GMO products is low because the GMO approval process “is badly flawed,” says Gregory Jaffe, biotechnology director at the Center for Science in the Public Interest. For the newly approved apple and potato, FDA evaluated data produced by the companies and encouraged voluntary consultations between the businesses and the agency.

“Congress should pass legislation that requires new biotech crops to undergo a rigorous and mandatory approval process before foods made from those crops reach the marketplace,” Jaffe says. “Such a system would give consumers much greater confidence that all genetically engineered products have been independently reviewed and found to be safe,” he says.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
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