Paint-Stripping Chemical Said To Pose Health Risks | Chemical & Engineering News
  • This week’s selections are from the ACS national meeting, which took place on March 22–26 in Denver.
Volume 93 Issue 13 | p. 24 | Concentrates
Issue Date: March 30, 2015

Paint-Stripping Chemical Said To Pose Health Risks

Department: Government & Policy
Keywords: risk assessment, EPA, paint removal
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N-methylpyrrolidone (above) is used in paint stripper for aircraft, ships, and furniture.
Credit: Air Force photo by Margo Wright
Tinker Air Force Base, Okla. -- Painter Zach Boydstun scrubs loosened paint, primer, and the pink paint stripper from a B-52 nose cowling. 2010 photo.
 
N-methylpyrrolidone (above) is used in paint stripper for aircraft, ships, and furniture.
Credit: Air Force photo by Margo Wright

N-Methylpyrrolidone (NMP), a solvent commonly used to remove paint and other coatings, poses reproductive risks to pregnant women and women of childbearing age, concludes a final risk assessment by EPA. Women can reduce these risks by wearing chemical-resistant gloves when they use NMP, the agency says. But neither gloves nor respirators sufficiently protect those who are exposed to NMP for more than four hours per day or repeatedly over several consecutive days, it adds. EPA has yet to decide how to address these risks, but the agency is considering both voluntary and regulatory actions, including a phaseout of the compound from U.S. commerce. The agency also recommends that women of childbearing age use safer paint-stripping chemicals or apply NMP outside or in well-ventilated areas.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
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