Structure of Ebola virus’s glycoprotein reveals an Achilles heel | July 4, 2016 Issue - Vol. 94 Issue 27 | Chemical & Engineering News
Volume 94 Issue 27 | p. 9 | News of The Week
Issue Date: July 4, 2016 | Web Date: June 29, 2016

Structure of Ebola virus’s glycoprotein reveals an Achilles heel

Drug designers may want to target a region that destabilizes the pathogen’s infection machinery
Department: Science & Technology
News Channels: Analytical SCENE, Biological SCENE
Keywords: infectious disease, Ebola
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A new 2.2-Å structure of the Ebola glycoprotein (sugars not shown) reveals a binding pocket, shown here containing the chemotherapy drug toremifene in yellow, that drug developers may want to target to thwart the virus.
Credit: Nature
Image of the Ebola glycoprotein.
 
A new 2.2-Å structure of the Ebola glycoprotein (sugars not shown) reveals a binding pocket, shown here containing the chemotherapy drug toremifene in yellow, that drug developers may want to target to thwart the virus.
Credit: Nature

When the Ebola virus infects a host cell, the first thing it does is attach itself to the cell using a glycoprotein. A newly obtained structure of that glycoprotein—the highest resolution one to date—now reveals a vulnerability in the virus’s infection machinery. Given the lack of approved therapies to combat the virus, this work gives medicinal chemists a weak point to target as they try to design molecules that stop Ebola’s deadly spread.

Researchers led by Oxford University’s David Stuart solved the structure of the virus glycoprotein to a resolution of 2.2 Å in complex with two different molecules that scientists have shown can reduce infection in rodents: ibuprofen and the chemotherapy drug toremifene (Nature 2016, DOI: 10.1038/nature18615).

Stuart’s team found that both chemicals bind in a buried pocket of the virus glycoprotein. The binding of these chemicals likely pushes the glycoprotein prematurely into a state where it can’t infect host cells, Stuart says.

Drug designers “will be salivating about that binding pocket,” comments Kartik Chandran, who studies Ebola at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. But it’s premature to think that toremifene or ibuprofen will end up as an Ebola drug, he cautions.

“People get really excited about repurposing FDA-approved drugs for fighting Ebola because they’ve already been proven safe in humans. But many small molecules that show promise in mice fail in macaques,” primates that are a more realistic human proxy than rodents, Chandran says. “The dose makes the drug—and toremifene doesn’t bind strongly to the virus glycoprotein. You may not want to give people who are already very sick high doses of a chemotherapy drug.” Chemists, however, could optimize compounds to fit much tighter in the binding pocket, now that they have this structure to work from, Chandran says.

“There’s quite some additional space in the binding pocket, and ibuprofen and toremifene aren’t very similar structures,” Stuart says. There are a lot of changes you could imagine that would optimize binding, he says.

In fact, many medicinal chemists may be surprised that toremifene and ibuprofen destabilize the pathogen’s virus glycoprotein, comments Felix Wieland, who studies Ebola at the University of Heidelberg. Most small molecules act like a stabilizer to proteins. This unusual feature might be capitalized upon for drug design, he notes.

 
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Comments
Wound Care (July 2, 2016 4:17 AM)
Ebola can spread through direct contact with an infected person’s (alive or dead) body fluids such as saliva, blood, vomit, mucus, urine or feces. The virus can spread through wounds also. This is why CDC recommends the isolation of patients with suspected or confirmed Ebola in a single room and advises staffs to wear gowns, gloves, surgical mask and goggles.

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