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Biological Chemistry

Sirenas awarded Gates grant

by Lisa M. Jarvis
October 3, 2016 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 94, ISSUE 39

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Credit: Shutterstock
Sirenas sees therapeutic molecules in marine organisms such as sea sponges.
Credit: Shutterstock
Sirenas sees therapeutic molecules in marine organisms such as sea sponges.

San Diego-based Sirenas has won a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to use nature-inspired chemistry to find molecules active against tuberculosis, malaria, and cryptosporidium. Sirenas has a collection of molecules derived from marine organisms such as sea sponges, cyanobacteria, and algae that it parses with data-mining technology to identify promising lead compounds. Scripps Research Institute California chemist and Sirenas cofounder Phil Baran oversees the development of methods for synthesizing complex marine molecules.

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