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Biological Chemistry

UCSF researchers pinpoint cancer immortality target

by Lisa Jarvis
September 15, 2018 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 96, ISSUE 37

 

09637-buscon17-glioblastoma.jpg
Credit: Costello Lab/UCSF
A mutation in the TERT promoter is common in the brain cancer glioblastoma, shown here.

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, have figured out how a mutation in a protein, the TERT promoter, can grant tumor cells the ability to multiply with abandon. In a paper in Cancer Cell (2018, DOI: 10.1016/j.ccell.2018.08.003), UCSF’s Joseph F. Costello identifies the GABP-β1L subunit of the protein as a potentially important new cancer drug target. Telo Therapeutics, a start-up founded by Costello and his former graduate student Robert Bell, is working with GlaxoSmithKline to screen small-molecule libraries for inhibitors of the subunit.

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