January 31, 2005 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
Copyright © 2005 American Chemical Society
 

January 31, 2005 Issue

Volume 83, Issue 5
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January 31, 2005 Issue, Vol. 83 | Iss. 5
New Congress faces severe budget constraints as it tackles perennial issues such as energy policy, air quality, and homeland security
By Government & Policy Department
(pp. 23-30)
Features
Science & Technology
Huygens probe reveals a world of methane rain and hydrocarbon dirt  
Science & Technology
Scientists are probing the inner workings of machines that power key biological processes  (pp. 32-34)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Exotic Chemistry On Frigid Titan

Huygens probe reveals a world of methane rain and hydrocarbon dirt
(p.7)

Dow In China

New R&D center will employ 600 people by 2007
(p.8)

Cheaper Auto Exhaust Catalysts

High-throughput screening reveals promising low-cost Co-Ba catalyst
(p.9)

Chemical Earnings

Higher prices and volumes continue to drive improvement in results
(p.10)

Fluorescent Lock

Imaging probes fluoresce only when unmasked by trimethyl lock reaction
(p.10)

Million-Dollar Engineering Challenge Established

First award will be for a system that removes arsenic from contaminated drinking water
(p.10)

Global Warning

Experts call for action now to avert runaway climate change
(p.11)
 

Departments

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Books

Two experts on the industry and public policy square off on Marcia Angell's provocative book
(pp. 42-43)
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Science & Technology

Some complain that 'diversity-oriented synthesis' is a superfluous catchphrase
(p.40)
Scientists are probing the inner workings of machines that power key biological processes
(pp. 32-34)
DNA encodes small-molecule synthesis and offers potential to evolve drugs
(pp. 35-36)
Compound undergoes an intramolecular reaction to form a product with a different function
(p.38)
First microwave studies of the complex in the gas phase shed light on its potential importance
(p.39)

Editor's Page

This guest editorial is by Richard N. Zare, Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science at Stanford University's department of chemistry.
(p.3)

Letters

Letters(p.4)