Copyright © 2005 American Chemical Society
 

August 22, 2005 Issue

Volume 83, Issue 34
8334cov1aopening
August 22, 2005 Issue, Vol. 83 | Iss. 34
New materials and methods are improving hydrogen storage and production technology, but significant challenges remain
By Mitch Jacoby, C&EN Chicago
(pp. 42-47)
Features
Science & Technology
Radioactive carbon monoxide is used to trace key atmospheric "cleanser" 
Science & Technology
Free IUPAC software converts structures to computer-readable representations (pp. 39-40)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Finding Hydroxyl

Radioactive carbon monoxide is used to trace key atmospheric "cleanser"
(p.9)

Thin, Transparent Nanotube Sheets

Strong, electrically conductive material promises a host of high-tech uses
(p.10)

Los Alamos Mishaps

Contamination, chemical exposure incidents spark new inquiries
(p.11)

New Approach To Glycosylation

Technique could facilitate one-pot and automated syntheses of carbohydrates
(p.11)

Hydrogel Releases Drug In Two Steps

Delivery system relies on low-molecular-weight hydrogel and enzyme
(p.12)

Solar Energy Needs Major Push

DOE says considerable research is required to improve solar energy
(p.12)

Chiral Route To A Privileged Class

Process is first highly enantioselective route to bioactive dihydropyrimidones
(p.13)
 

Departments

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Government & Policy

Through the EPA funding law for 2006, Congress is shaping agency's activities
(pp. 28-29)
Romm and Chalk take sides over research priorities and hydrogen's role in future transportation and energy security issues
(pp. 30-35)

Books

Essays explore the origins, meaning, and importance of the periodic table
(pp. 48-49)
8334cov1aopening

Science & Technology

New materials and methods are improving hydrogen storage and production technology, but significant challenges remain
(pp. 42-47)
New Software and Websites for the Chemical Enterprise
(p.41)
Free IUPAC software converts structures to computer-readable representations
(pp. 39-40)

Career & Employment

Agricultural biotechnology still has untapped potential to change the face of farming
(p.51)

Editor's Page

Letters

Letters(pp. 6-8)