April 19, 2004 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
Copyright © 2004 American Chemical Society
 

April 19, 2004 Issue

Volume 82, Issue 16
8216cov1a
April 19, 2004 Issue, Vol. 82 | Iss. 16
Key players in the specialties sector claim they have evolved through adversity, adapting for success in emerging growth markets
By PATRICIA L. SHORT, RICK MULLIN, ALEXANDER H. TULLO
(pp. 17-27)
Features
Science & Technology
New phase could lead to faster responding liquid-crystal displays 
Science & Technology
The 50-year-old field is now poised for wider application in organic synthesis than ever before (pp. 36-39)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

LIQUID CRYSTALS ALIGN ON TWO AXES

New phase could lead to faster responding liquid-crystal displays
(p.6)

DUPONT WILL SHED JOBS

Number two chemical maker will eliminate 3,500 positions this year
(p.7)

DESTROYING MUSTARD GAS

Mercury-tainted agent prompts method change at Utah facility
(p.8)

RNA ROUTE TO NANOPARTICLES

Evolved RNA sequences cause metal atoms to bond and form uniform crystals
(p.9)

UCSD SELECTS FOX

NCSU chancellor will become chancellor of UC San Diego
(p.9)

LAYERED MATERIAL HOLDS MORE DATA

Onionlike polymer particles ideal for secure encryption and identification
(p.10)
 

Departments

ACS News

Full-time work was harder to find for 2002-03 chemistry graduates
(pp. 51-55)

Education

ACS's Academic Employment Initiative aims to broaden chemistry's traditional hiring practices
(pp. 45-47)
SAMULSKIPicaa

Science & Technology

The 50-year-old field is now poised for wider application in organic synthesis than ever before
(pp. 36-39)
New examples and applications of circular and knotted peptides and proteins are turning up
(pp. 40-42)
(pp. 43-44)

Career & Employment

Partisan dispute over job creation focuses attention on jobs data and what they really mean
(pp. 30-33)