April 26, 2004 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
Copyright © 2004 American Chemical Society
 

April 26, 2004 Issue

Volume 82, Issue 17
8217cov1a
April 26, 2004 Issue, Vol. 82 | Iss. 17
Once left in the dust by protein modeling, carbohydrates come into their own
By PATRICIA L. SHORT, RICK MULLIN, ALEXANDER H. TULLO
(pp. 36-39)
Features
Science & Technology
Electrospinning, sol-gel chemistry are combined to form nanotubular fibers 
Science & Technology
Bacterial cellulose's unique properties lead to its proposed uses in electronic paper, wound care (pp. 24-25)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

NEW SCIENCE MUSEUM OPENS IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

Koshland museum exhibits inspired by interests of the National Academy of Sciences
(p.1)

HOLLOW NANOFIBERS IN A SINGLE STEP

Electrospinning, sol-gel chemistry are combined to form nanotubular fibers
(p.6)

LUBRIZOL TO ACQUIRE NOVEON

$1.8 billion buy to create $3.2 billion specialty chemicals firm
(p.7)

BIOBASED ECONOMY

Conference emphasizes links between biotech, chemistry, and agriculture
(p.8)

RHODIA DENIES ACCESS TO PLANT

U.S. officials get first warrant for inspection under chemical arms treaty
(p.8)

KKR SNAPS UP CHEMICAL UNITS

Investment firm’s buy of four businesses will create large specialties player
(p.9)

HONORING PUBLIC SERVICE

ACS recognizes three individuals for contributions to science policy
(p.10)

NAS ELECTS NEW MEMBERS

Academy chooses 19 women among 72 new members and 18 foreign associates
(p.10)
 

Departments

ACS News

Candidates chosen and announced for national office, dues increased, committees report
(pp. 42-43)
(p.44)
8217gov1a

Government & Policy

DOE wants most high-level radioactive waste to take the train to the Yucca Mountain repository
(p.20)
Long-range study is nearly ready, but funds aren't available for implementation
(p.21)

Education

Ethics education makes its way into the college chemistry curriculum, but is that too late to start?
(pp. 33-35)
8217cov1a

Science & Technology

Once left in the dust by protein modeling, carbohydrates come into their own
(pp. 36-39)
New Software And Websites For The Chemical Enterprise
(pp. 29-31)
Clay, silica, and plant-derived alternatives compete to keep your cat's box clean
(p.26)
Bacterial cellulose's unique properties lead to its proposed uses in electronic paper, wound care
(pp. 24-25)
UC San Diego chemist set out to learn crystallography--that was 6,000 structures ago
(p.28)

Editor's Page

Letters

Letters(pp. 4-5)