Copyright © 2004 American Chemical Society
 

September 27, 2004 Issue

Volume 82, Issue 39
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September 27, 2004 Issue, Vol. 82 | Iss. 39
New computer architectures, algorithms, and hardware increase computing power for computational chemists
By ELIZABETH K. WILSON, C&EN WEST COAST NEWS BUREAU
(pp. 35-40)
Features
Government & Policy
EPA study finds that bent grass transgenes can travel as far as 13 miles 
Science & Technology
Studies reveal that catalytic properties of small particles depend on their size and imperfections (pp. 23-24)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

GENE FLOW FROM TRANSGENIC GRASS

EPA study finds that bent grass transgenes can travel as far as 13 miles
(p.5)

PQ PUTS ITSELF UP FOR SALE

Family-owned firm hires investment banker to review options
(p.6)

THIOSTREPTON FROM SCRATCH

First total synthesis of complex antibiotic with unusual mechanism
(p.7)

HUMAN CELLS MAKE MORPHINE

Morphine found in human cells is of endogenous origin
(p.8)

MORPHINE-FREE POPPIES

Biosynthetic pathway for morphine blocked in mutant poppies
(p.8)

POROUS SUPPORTS

Large-pore ceramic with open structure boosts activity of supported catalysts
(p.9)
 

Departments

Education

C&EN's annual survey shows that women remain underrepresented in top chemistry departments
(pp. 32-33)

Science & Technology

New computer architectures, algorithms, and hardware increase computing power for computational chemists
(pp. 35-40)
Studies reveal that catalytic properties of small particles depend on their size and imperfections
(pp. 23-24)
Panel addresses questions regarding the novelty and importance of nanotechnology in catalysis
(pp. 25-26)
Electron microscopy studies inspire new model for how bacteria synthesize polyesters
(p.27)
For good or for bad, chemists play a central role in the world of performance-enhancing drugs
(p.28)

Editor's Page