Copyright © 2004 American Chemical Society
 

October 4, 2004 Issue

Volume 82, Issue 40
8240coverstory1open
October 4, 2004 Issue, Vol. 82 | Iss. 40
Hopes abound that a new generation of technologies can make clean, affordable electricity from power of tides, waves, or any water in motion
By JEFF JOHNSON, C&EN WASHINGTON
(pp. 23-30)
Features
Government & Policy
Health agency proposes policy to manage conflict-of-interest concerns  
Science & Technology
Diversity-oriented synthesis aims to pick up where traditional combinatorial chemistry left off  (pp. 32-40)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

NIH BANS OUTSIDE CONSULTING

Health agency proposes policy to manage conflict-of-interest concerns
(p.7)

IN SEARCH OF A BIOSENSING BIOCIDE

Simple compound is eyed as a lead to a chemical/biological counteragent
(p.8)

MATCHMAKING

State Department aims to link former Soviet arms scientists with Western firms
(p.9)

PROBING THE UNSEEN

Methods reported for fabricating and characterizing molecular-scale structures
(p.10)

PHTHALATES IN TOYS

EU bans some phthalates in toys and child care products
(p.11)
 

Departments

8240coverstory1open

Government & Policy

Hopes abound that a new generation of technologies can make clean, affordable electricity from power of tides, waves, or any water in motion
(pp. 23-30)
NIH policy requires investigators to include plan for sharing model organisms in grant proposals
(p.21)

Education

At chemistry education conference, participants discuss the challenge of communicating chemistry
(pp. 46-48)

Science & Technology

Diversity-oriented synthesis aims to pick up where traditional combinatorial chemistry left off
(pp. 32-40)
Ink-jet printing moves combinatorial polymer research to the head of the queue
(pp. 41-43)
Finding household drugs in U.S. drinking water has raised complex issues of toxicity, removal
(pp. 44-45)

Career & Employment