September 13, 2004 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
Copyright © 2004 American Chemical Society
 

September 13, 2004 Issue

Volume 82, Issue 37
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September 13, 2004 Issue, Vol. 82 | Iss. 37
Enhanced safety, improved economics, and simpler designs are the keynotes of the next generations of nuclear energy systems
By MICHAEL FREEMANTLE, C&EN LONDON
(pp. 31-35)
Features
Science & Technology
X-ray structure reveals how protein ushers NH3 across cell membranes 
Science & Technology
The Perkin Medal goes to Gordon Moore, who as a youngster, was captivated by chemistry (pp. 25-26)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

CHANNEL PROTEIN STEERS GAS

X-ray structure reveals how protein ushers NH3 across cell membranes
(p.5)

HURRICANE HAVOC

Storms affected Florida's environment, industry, and some science facilities
(p.6)

NIH UNVEILS DRAFT OPEN-ACCESS PLAN

Agency's policy closely resembles one proposed by Congress
(p.7)

STAPH FAVORS HEME

Given a choice, pathogen prefers to get its iron from iron porphyrin in blood
(p.7)

FLOATING DROPLETS

Magnetic levitation technique could have uses in crystallization, synthesis
(p.8)

SHAPE-SHIFTER

Molecular assemblies change their form depending on temperature
(p.9)
 

Departments

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Government & Policy

Revelations about antidepressants have intensified calls for release of clinical trial results
(pp. 19-21)
Congress is set to assess how best to improve intelligence, homeland security oversight
(p.22)
Enhanced safety, improved economics, and simpler designs are the keynotes of the next generations of nuclear energy systems
(pp. 31-35)

Science & Technology

The Perkin Medal goes to Gordon Moore, who as a youngster, was captivated by chemistry
(pp. 25-26)
Enantioselective hydrogenation of unprotected enamines is possible, Merck chemists find
(p.28)
(pp. 29-30)
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Editor's Page

This guest editorial is by Arnold Thackray, president of the Chemical Heritage Foundation.
(p.3)