June 7, 2004 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
Copyright © 2004 American Chemical Society
 

June 7, 2004 Issue

Volume 82, Issue 23
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June 7, 2004 Issue, Vol. 82 | Iss. 23
Smokescreen or true reform? Has the chemical industry changed enough to make another massive accident unlikely?
By Marc S. Reisch
(pp. 19-23)
Features
Science & Technology
Helical nanotubes show potential for use in molecular electronics 
Science & Technology
Chemistry at the Caribbean's University of the West Indies is thriving despite funding struggles (pp. 36-37)
Back Issues
 
TRACK US, TRUST US
American Chemistry Council says will supply the facts to earn the public's trust
(pp. 24-25)
 

News of the Week

TWISTED BY DESIGN

Helical nanotubes show potential for use in molecular electronics
(p.7)

NORTH AMERICAN POLLUTION

Chemical sector was third in releases for 2001, report says
(p.8)

FIRMS SELL OFF DYES, SPECIALTIES

Private companies buy DyStar joint venture, Eastman’s industrial resins
(p.9)

CAR AND COAL EMISSIONS INTERACT

Organic acids may help spur the growth of aerosol particles
(p.10)

SPLICE OF LIFE

Crystal structure reveals workings of self-splicing group I intron
(p.10)
 

Departments

Business

Smokescreen or true reform? Has the chemical industry changed enough to make another massive accident unlikely?
(pp. 19-23)
Enlargement offers chemical opportunities as the borders open to Central, Eastern Europe
(pp. 14-16)
Microbia's Precision Engineering unit brings in cash to fund a drug discovery effort
(p.17)
The business impact of the Saudi terrorist attacks will not be as dramatic as the attacks themselves
(p.18)
American Chemistry Council says will supply the facts to earn the public's trust
(pp. 24-25)

ACS News

Chemical landmark honors research that saved cotton from being mothballed
(p.41)
(p.42)
(p.43)
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Government & Policy

Proposed budget cuts threaten agency effort on building decontamination
(pp. 27-28)
Brookings Institution scholar offers a way to restore science, technology advice to Congress
(p.29)

Books

8223notwHBC

Science & Technology

In A Region Rich With Flora And Fauna, Natural Products Research Enjoys A Long Tradition
(p.33)
Scientists in Barbados hope to apply a scientific approach to improving playing fields for cricket, the region’s favorite sport
Among Those Studying Chemistry At UWI, Women Far Outnumber Men
Web Exclusive
Chemistry at the Caribbean's University of the West Indies is thriving despite funding struggles
(pp. 36-37)
From humble beginnings, legendary inventor and philanthropist made the most of his 104 years
(pp. 36-37)
New research facilities and federal funding boost research in the chemical sciences
(p.38)

Career & Employment

Flavor and fragrance work combines biology, psychology, and chemistry
(pp. 45-48)

Editor's Page