Copyright © 2015 American Chemical Society
 

November 16, 2015 Issue

Volume 93, Issue 45
09345-cover-opener
November 16, 2015 Issue, Vol. 93 | Iss. 45
Companies and academics seek out profitable pathways to materials made from the unwanted gas
By Alex Scott
(pp. 10-16)
Features
Business
Experts lament a thinner drug pipeline but point to promise in a new molecule from Gilead (pp. 20-22)
Science & Technology
The three scientists honored for their work in DNA repair made crucial contributions, but critics wonder about those left off the list (pp. 35-36)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

This Liquid Has Holes In It, Thanks To Chemistry

Materials Science: Liquid made with cage compounds has permanent pores and could one day help with gas separations
(p.5)

Breen Becomes DuPont’s New CEO

Management: Interim leader gets permanent job at a pivotal time for the company
(p.6)

CO2 Levels Approaching 400 PPM, Global Scientific Group Reports

Climate Change: Pledges for new treaty aren’t enough to restrain temperature rise to 2 °C
(p.6)

Antibody Therapies Don’t Improve Neuron Function In Mice

Neuroscience: The proteins can clear toxic amyloid-β out of the animals’ brains but don’t calm hyperactive nerve cell firing
(p.7)

China’s Drug Discovery Firms Will Soon Be Able To Launch Their Own Medicines

Chinese government’s move is expected to encourage innovation in the pharmaceutical sector
(p.7)

Agent Could Fight Cancer By Inhibiting Copper Transport In Diseased Cells

Drug Discovery: Small molecule selectively inhibits interactions between proteins in copper trafficking pathway
(p.8)

Neurotoxin Scuttles Crab Season

Environment: Domoic acid contamination due to algal bloom caused by El Nino-warmed waters in Pacific
(p.8)

A New Way To Learn Your Chemistry History

New Manhattan Project National Historic Park will explore atomic bomb’s development and aftermath
(p.9)

Unnatural Bases Help Scientists Mark DNA Lesions

DNA Analysis: Hydrophobic base pair works with PCR amplification and nanopore sequencing to tag and identify DNA damage
(p.9)
 

Departments

09345-scitech2-nobel

Science & Technology

The three scientists honored for their work in DNA repair made crucial contributions, but critics wonder about those left off the list
(pp. 35-36)
Chemists work to develop ways to pull a broad range of poisons from overdose patients
(pp. 33-34)
Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning gives us a dose of the molecules behind decongestants, cough syrups, and throat lozenges
(p.37)
Neurociencia: Las proteínas pueden eliminar los β-amiloides tóxicos del cerebro de los animales pero no disminuyen la hiperactividad de células nerviosas.
(p.7)

Career & Employment

Chemists with disabilities share their stories on overcoming challenges in the workplace
(pp. 40-41)

Editor's Page