Copyright © 2015 American Chemical Society
 

February 23, 2015 Issue

Volume 93, Issue 8
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February 23, 2015 Issue, Vol. 93 | Iss. 8
The release of poison gas 100 years ago changed the face of World War I and gave humanity a new weapon of mass destruction
By Sarah Everts
(pp. 9-21)
Features
Business
Suppliers broaden their chemistry offerings through R&D, collaborations, and acquisitions (pp. 24-25)
ACS News
The Big Easy will host more than 17,000 attendees at annual conference and expo on lab science  (pp. 50-52)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Spying On Bond Making In Solution

Reaction Chemistry: X-ray scattering study analyzes ultrafast process in unprecedented detail
(p.4)

Department Of Agriculture Approves First Genetically Modified Apple, Which Resists Turning Brown

Regulation: Activists and growers remain concerned about commercialization of new fruit
(p.5)

New TB Drug Enters Trials

Neglected Diseases: Milestone comes despite waning pharma interest
(p.5)

General Mills To Remove Antioxidant BHT From Its Cereals

Blogger known as Food Babe strikes again
(p.6)

Drugs That Regulate Metabolism May Treat Lupus

Autoimmune Disease: Immune cells in mice with lupus symptoms have overactive metabolisms, study shows
(p.7)

Sunlight And Melanin Implicated In Cancerous Chemistry

Photochemistry: Skin pigments participate in DNA-damaging reactions hours after exposure to UV light
(p.7)
 

Departments

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Science & Technology

A look at recent patenting activity in nanomedicines, brought to you by C&EN and CAS
(p.40)
The release of poison gas 100 years ago changed the face of World War I and gave humanity a new weapon of mass destruction
(pp. 9-21)
Chemists argue over how the sacred concept of aromaticity should be invoked
(pp. 37-38)
Epigenomics: Most comprehensive results to date in collaborative epigenome-mapping project
(p.6)
C&EN Online Exclusive: Chemists discuss the merits of the unbridled use of the concept of aromaticity
All antibody reagents should be sequenced and then produced using those sequences in a standardized way, scientists say
(p.39)