December 18, 2017 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society
 

December 18, 2017 Issue

Volume 95, Issue 49
09549-cover1-stars
December 18, 2017 Issue, Vol. 95 | Iss. 49
A look at the science that shone brightest in 2017
By
(p.19)
Features
Science & Technology
Steam treating enhances platinum’s durability and knack for scrubbing CO from engine emissions (p.5)
Science & Technology
Un tratamiento con vapor de agua aumenta la vida media de los catalizadores de platino y los apaña para eliminar hasta la última molécula de CO de las emisiones de los motores (p.5)
ACS News
Chemists and chemistry enthusiasts demonstrate to the public the many ways that ‘Chemistry Rocks!’ (pp. 48-50)
Back Issues
 
Molecules of the year
C&EN highlights some of the coolest compounds reported in 2017
(pp. 2-3)
Computer-driven research reached new milestones
Machine learning and quantum computing tackled complex problems
(p.20)
Electrosynthesis got chemists charged up
Using electric current as a reagent streamlined organic reactions by avoiding hazardous chemicals, generating less waste, and reducing cost
(p.21)
Modified and newly discovered enzymes sparked innovative chemistry
Advances this year included improved alkene oxidations, fatty acid decarboxylations, and aromatic alkylations
(p.22)
Flow chemistry advanced in industry
Lilly chemists capitalized on continuous chemical manufacturing to make a chemotherapy drug candidate
(p.23)
Big moves for little machines
Geared up after last year’s Nobel nod, researchers put rotors, drills, pulleys, and more into action
(pp. 24-25)
Artificial devices mimicked the female reproductive system
A modular microfluidic device replicated the menstrual cycle and an artificial ovary restored fertility in mice
(p.26)
Probiotics found success in a large trial
Combination of probiotic strain and prebiotic sugar prevented sepsis in trial involving 4,556 infants
(p.27)
Single-molecule experiment unveils polymer growth spurts
Researchers got the first detailed look at how catalysts crank out polymer chains
(p.27)
Tug-of-war emerged over chemical safety rules
Controversial leaders sparred with senators and environmental activists
(p.31)
Science news from around the world
China tackled its air pollution problem, Russia finished destroying its chemical weapons, and the Middle East opened the region’s first synchrotron light source. Elsewhere, the Atlantic hurricane season battered the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean islands, concerns rose about Brexit’s effects on pharmaceutical supplies, research funding became a critical issue in India and Brazil, and African scientists established a new open access publishing platform.
(pp. 34-35)
Luminaries we lost
These giants of chemistry will be missed by the scientific community
(p.39)
What will make headlines in 2018?
C&EN reporters share their thoughts
(p.40)
G protein-coupled receptor structures aided drug design
A decade after a key structural analysis, scientists have a better understanding of the pharmaceutically important family of receptor proteins
(pp. 42-43)
Covalent organic frameworks debuted and multiplied quickly
The variety of porous, metal-free crystals and their applications has grown, but no signs yet of commercialization
(p.44)
Reversing Rett syndrome in mice gave hope for treatments
Experiment demonstrated that fixing the molecular basis for the disease could restore lost function
(p.45)
Chemistry then and now: 2007 versus 2017
C&EN compares snapshots of the chemistry scene today and a decade ago
(p.46)
 

News of the Week

Catalyst treatment could boost exhaust cleanup

Steam treating enhances platinum’s durability and knack for scrubbing CO from engine emissions
(p.5)

Un tratamiento para catalizadores aumentaría la limpieza de los gases de combustión

Un tratamiento con vapor de agua aumenta la vida media de los catalizadores de platino y los apaña para eliminar hasta la última molécula de CO de las emisiones de los motores
(p.5)

A mother’s immune system could influence sons’ sexual orientation

Antibodies produced from carrying multiple male fetuses could help explain why having older brothers increases a man’s likelihood of being gay
(p.6)

Metal-organic framework compound sets methane storage record

Sol-gel synthesis boosts the capacity of a common porous material
(p.6)

Chemists forge green path to alkylated amines

Process uses microbe-derived amino acids to produce the industrially important building blocks
(p.7)

A greener way to get lithium?

Sorbent could extract the battery material from geothermal power plant brine
(p.8)

DNA origami hits the big time

New set of techniques enables the mass-production of micrometer-sized DNA structures
(p.8)

Another twist in marine toxin’s structural saga

Researchers synthesize azaspiracid and uncover structural misassignment
(p.9)

FTC seeks to block Tronox’s purchase of Cristal

Regulator says the combined firm will wield too much power in the titanium dioxide market
(p.12)

Obsidian launches with $49.5 million to fine-tune cellular and gene therapies

Tunable technology was born in the labs of Stanford professor Thomas Wandless
(p.12)

EU’s chlorine makers end mercury-based production

Europe’s Dec. 11 ban brings 21 mercury cell production plants to a halt
(p.13)

Nobel Prize winner introduces skin care line

Molecular machine builder Fraser Stoddart is behind new firm that will sell high-priced antiaging cosmetics
(p.13)

Brazil asbestos ban impacts U.S. imports

Russia is now the sole source of carcinogenic mineral for the U.S.
(p.16)

U.S. Chemical Safety Board sued for not creating emissions reporting rule

Regulation proposed in 2009 but dropped because of cost, industry opposition
(p.16)
 

Departments

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Government & Policy

Controversial leaders sparred with senators and environmental activists
(p.31)
C&EN reporters share their thoughts
(p.40)
China tackled its air pollution problem, Russia finished destroying its chemical weapons, and the Middle East opened the region’s first synchrotron light source. Elsewhere, the Atlantic hurricane season battered the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean islands, concerns rose about Brexit’s effects on pharmaceutical supplies, research funding became a critical issue in India and Brazil, and African scientists established a new open access publishing platform.
(pp. 34-35)
09549-cover10-sulflower

Science & Technology

C&EN highlights some of the coolest compounds reported in 2017
(pp. 2-3)
Combination of probiotic strain and prebiotic sugar prevented sepsis in trial involving 4,556 infants
(p.27)
Geared up after last year’s Nobel nod, researchers put rotors, drills, pulleys, and more into action
(pp. 24-25)
Machine learning and quantum computing tackled complex problems
(p.20)
Lilly chemists capitalized on continuous chemical manufacturing to make a chemotherapy drug candidate
(p.23)
Using electric current as a reagent streamlined organic reactions by avoiding hazardous chemicals, generating less waste, and reducing cost
(p.21)
Researchers got the first detailed look at how catalysts crank out polymer chains
(p.27)
Advances this year included improved alkene oxidations, fatty acid decarboxylations, and aromatic alkylations
(p.22)
A modular microfluidic device replicated the menstrual cycle and an artificial ovary restored fertility in mice
(p.26)
Experiment demonstrated that fixing the molecular basis for the disease could restore lost function
(p.45)
The variety of porous, metal-free crystals and their applications has grown, but no signs yet of commercialization
(p.44)
C&EN compares snapshots of the chemistry scene today and a decade ago
(p.46)
A decade after a key structural analysis, scientists have a better understanding of the pharmaceutically important family of receptor proteins
(pp. 42-43)
Stacked miniature hydrogel compartments generate electricity via ion gradient
(p.10)
Health benefits are achieved in rats with lower hormone doses than current estrogen-based drug treatment
(p.10)
Ground-based measurements indicate that γ rays generated during thunderstorms can transform atmospheric nuclei
(pp. 10-11)
Strings formed from supramolecular assembly flex when illuminated
(p.11)
Chemists develop a metal complex that provides the best evidence yet for reversible two-electron redox properties in an f-block element
(p.11)
Aluminum sulfate traps phosphorus in sediment so it doesn’t drain from farms and pollute waterways
(p.11)
A look at the science that shone brightest in 2017
(p.19)

Editor's Page

Letters

(pp. 3-4)