Copyright © 2005 American Chemical Society
 

November 28, 2005 Issue

Volume 83, Issue 48
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November 28, 2005 Issue, Vol. 83 | Iss. 48
Field ion microscopy, the oldest technique for ‘viewing' individual atoms, continues to uncover materials secrets with exceptional resolution
By Mitch Jacoby
(pp. 13-16)
Features
Science & Technology
Analyses of trapped air show current CO2 at highest level in 650,000 years (p.7)
Science & Technology
With little fanfare, structure-based drug design is filling development pipelines (pp. 28-30)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Bush Names National Medalists

Chemistry links four of the honorees
(p.1)

Ice Core Record Extended

Analyses of trapped air show current CO2 at highest level in 650,000 years
(p.7)

Pfizer Taps Incyte For Compounds

Drug giant advances a strategy of supplementing its internal pipeline
(p.8)

White House Honors Scientists

Bush names national medalists; exceptional mentors are also recognized
(p.9)

Artificial Cells Allow Ion Entry

Porous inorganic capsules serve as models for biological ion-transport processes
(p.10)

CO2-To-CO Route

Copper boryl complex catalyzes CO2 reduction in well-characterized system
(p.10)
 

Departments

8348cover_opencxd

Science & Technology

Field ion microscopy, the oldest technique for ‘viewing' individual atoms, continues to uncover materials secrets with exceptional resolution
(pp. 13-16)
With little fanfare, structure-based drug design is filling development pipelines
(pp. 28-30)
Synthesis of novel uranium-nitrogen compounds is helping to fuel resurgence in actinide science
(pp. 31-33)
Troubling trend points to the need for new strategies to deal with threatened coastal communities
(p.34)