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May 4, 2020 Issue

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May 4, 2020 Cover

Volume 98, Issue 17

Long-lasting hair dyes are popular, and their safety has been well researched. But new epidemiology studies show their use correlates with increased risk of breast cancer

Cover image:Long-lasting hair dyes are popular, and their safety has been well researched. But new epidemiology studies show their use correlates with increased risk of breast cancer


Credit: Shutterstock

Full Article
Volume 98 | Issue 17

All Issues

Quote of the Week

“It’s the very definition of foolhardy to try to keep burning these things.”

David Bond, associate director, Center for the Advancement of Public Action, Bennington College, on incinerating per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances

Consumer Products

Cancer risk studies raise questions about the safety of long-lasting hair dyes

Long-lasting hair dyes are popular, and their safety has been well researched. But new epidemiology studies show their use correlates with increased risk of breast cancer

  • How genomic epidemiology is tracking the spread of COVID-19 locally and globally

    The novel coronavirus is challenging genome sequencing technology and data processing like never before

  • Xiaogang Liu is using fluorescence to tackle the problem of illicit cooking oil

    The Singapore-based physical chemist is building a database of fluorescence fingerprints to help nab adulterated food products

  • Career Ladder: Abril Estrada

    This biomaterials chemist makes pet food proteins from nonanimal sources

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Drug Development

Data from remdesivir clinical trial offer hope along with caveats

Limited results from a NIAID study suggest the drug helps people with COVID-19 recover faster

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