October 14, 2013 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
Copyright © 2013 American Chemical Society
 

October 14, 2013 Issue

Volume 91, Issue 41
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October 14, 2013 Issue, Vol. 91 | Iss. 41
Predictive Models for hazards and exposure improve, but gaps remain
By Britt E. Erickson
(pp. 12-14)
Features
Business
Chinese scientists who studied together two decades ago in Shanghai enjoy great success in U.S. drug discovery (pp. 22-23)
Science & Technology
Research shows the effects of acidification on life are more complex than previously thought (pp. 33-35)
Back Issues
 
Risk By Association
Scientists often start with an observed link between chemical exposure and a health risk, then design studies to confirm it
(pp. 15-17)
Perception Puzzle
Emotion and trust play important roles in how the public views risks from chemicals
(pp. 18-19)
 

News of the Week

2013 Nobel Prize In Chemistry

Awards: Karplus, Levitt, and Warshel honored for modeling complex chemical systems
(p.5)

2013 Nobel Prize In Physics

Awards: Two European researchers recognized for their contributions to particle physics
(p.6)

Malaria Vaccine Nears Finish Line

Global Health: GSK could ask for a regulatory review by 2014
(p.6)

2013 Nobel Prize In Physiology Or Medicine

Awards: Three U.S. researchers share prize for work on vesicle transport
(p.7)

Boehringer Ingelheim's Ben Venue Labs To Close

The firm will shutter its troubled Ohio plant, affecting 1,100 employees.
(p.7)

Balancing Aquatic Ps And Ns

Pollutants: Less phosphorus means more nitrogen—and algae
(p.8)

Solvay Gets Access To Shale Boom With Acquisition Of Chemlogics

Oil and gas boom: $1.3 billion deal will help Solvay increase sales of specialty chemicals
(p.8)

Government Shutdown Impacts Grow

Budget: More federal agencies close as damage to R&D programs spreads
(p.9)
 

Departments

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Government & Policy

Regulators mull new safeguards for railcars that carry liquid hazardous materials
(pp. 27-28)
Emotion and trust play important roles in how the public views risks from chemicals
(pp. 18-19)
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Science & Technology

Scientists often start with an observed link between chemical exposure and a health risk, then design studies to confirm it
(pp. 15-17)
Research shows the effects of acidification on life are more complex than previously thought
(pp. 33-35)
For researchers, creating chemicals that become commercially available is deeply satisfying, if not terribly lucrative
(pp. 31-32)
Predictive Models for hazards and exposure improve, but gaps remain
(pp. 12-14)

Editor's Page