Copyright © 2018 American Chemical Society
 

February 12, 2018 Issue

Volume 96, Issue 7
09607-cover-wilmington
February 12, 2018 Issue, Vol. 96 | Iss. 7
Despite efforts to prevent the industrial fluoroether from getting into North Carolina drinking water, it’s still present. Scientists are racing to find out why
By Cheryl Hogue
(pp. 2-8)
Features
Science & Technology
Ambitious research programs aim to overcome the roadblocks keeping these materials out of commercial solar cells (pp. 15-18)
Science & Technology
Researchers at Aalto University hope new scientific ideas can revitalize one of the country’s traditional economic engines (pp. 19-22)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

How lanthanides keep volcanic bacteria alive

Coordination complex reveals why rare-earth elements give methanol dehydrogenase enzyme a boost
(p.3)

Process makes wood stronger than steel

Alkaline boiling and hot pressing collapse wood’s pores, maximizing its density
(p.4)

Why don’t poison frogs poison themselves?

Researchers reveal protein mutations that protect these poisonous amphibians
(p.4)

Elusive Criegee reaction intermediate captured

Stabilized version of reactive species could aid study of Baeyer-Villiger reaction mechanism
(p.5)

Permafrost thaw could spike global mercury, study suggests

New assessment adds a million tons to estimates of mercury in soil
(p.6)

Jon M. Huntsman is dead at 80

The Huntsman Corp. founder was known for his philanthropy and his personal touch
(p.9)

Merged lawsuit filed against DuPont and Chemours in North Carolina

New suit seeks to compensate residents for fluorosurfactant-tainted drinking water from the Cape Fear River
(p.9)

Drug company earnings outlook bolstered by tax cuts and repatriated cash

Big pharma and biotech companies’ sales continue to rise, and investors hold out for more M&A activity in wake of tax reform
(p.10)

Drug development success rates are higher than previously reported

A study of nearly 186,000 clinical trials found that 13.8% of compounds make it from Phase I to approval
(p.10)

Global cancer agency’s funding in the crosshairs

U.S. Congress investigates science underlying glyphosate assessment
(p.13)

NSF addresses sexual harassment by grant recipients

Funding agency now requires institutions to report findings of harassment
(p.13)
 

Departments

09607-scitech2-finlandcxd-700

Science & Technology

Researchers at Aalto University hope new scientific ideas can revitalize one of the country’s traditional economic engines
(pp. 19-22)
Ambitious research programs aim to overcome the roadblocks keeping these materials out of commercial solar cells
(pp. 15-18)
Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of aryl bromides with vinylboron species risks heating up beyond control
(p.7)
New data may resolve debate over how antifreeze glycoproteins keep fish from freezing
(pp. 7-8)
Compounds previously made from toxic and pyrophoric elemental phosphorus can now be prepared starting with phosphoric acid
(p.7)
Method provides detailed thermal information needed for designing ultraminiature electronic devices
(p.7)
Ampulexins help wasps subdue cockroaches to serve as hosts
(p.8)
Multiphoton lithography makes cell-compatible microenvironment from photosensitive hydrogel
(p.8)

Letters

(p.2)