Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society
 

July 31, 2017 Issue

Volume 95, Issue 31
09531-cover-fig4AA-700
July 31, 2017 Issue, Vol. 95 | Iss. 31
Scientists are still uncovering all the players that help keep proteins folded inside cells—and all the ways the process can go wrong
By Sarah Everts
(pp. 32-38)
Features
Business
Consumers want clean labels, but ensuring food safety and shelf life without synthetics is a challenge (pp. 20-22)
Science & Technology
C&EN’s curated list of things to do, people to see, and science to learn (pp. 30-31)
ACS News
Washington, D.C., August 20–24  (pp. 45-67)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Chemists weave most complex pattern yet made from organic threads

Oligoproline strands self-assemble to form three-way woven structure
(p.5)

Liquid metals catalyze industrial reactions

Gallium-palladium droplets drive alkane dehydrogenation with high selectivity
(p.7)

Sunscreen reduces multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice

Scientists identify salicyclic acid derivatives as responsible for surprising effect
(p.7)

Slug mucus inspires possible surgical glue

Material sticks more strongly to wet tissues than commercially available medical adhesives do
(p.8)

Straightening out natural products’ stereochemistry

Multipronged method used to correct the structures of baulamycins A and B
(p.8)

Backward battery delivers ions to cells

Device could lead to biosensors and implants to treat neurological disorders
(p.9)

How to recycle lightly used drugs

Scientists develop a green process to recover valuable pharmaceuticals during drug development so they don’t go to waste
(p.9)

Eurofins acquires a third contract research firm

Advinus adds India lab to new assets in Canada and Europe
(p.13)

GSK, Lilly shake up research organizations

Both drug firms are shedding clinical-stage compounds amid an R&D overhaul
(p.13)

Industrial demand boosts earnings

Dow, BASF, Covestro, DuPont say manufacturers’ need for materials drove increases in second quarter
(p.14)

Corning invests in glass innovation

Company to spend $4 billion on new material for pharmaceutical vials
(p.15)

Calls to poison centers about dietary supplements on the rise

More education and regulation are needed, data analysis suggests
(p.19)

U.S. lawmakers introduce bill to ban chlorpyrifos

Legislation aims to prohibit use of neurotoxic chemical on food crops
(p.19)
 

Departments

09531-bus1-hotdogscxd

Business

Consumers want clean labels, but ensuring food safety and shelf life without synthetics is a challenge
(pp. 20-22)
On the verge of going private, the drug services innovator sorts through a stream of acquisitions
(pp. 28-29)
After a dozen years, researchers have struck upon a molecule that can disrupt an elusive HIV target
(pp. 23-25)

ACS News

Washington, D.C., August 20–24
(pp. 45-67)
Introducing CAS’s newest class of chemical information scholars
(pp. 40-42)
09531-notw20-supplements

Government & Policy

More education and regulation are needed, data analysis suggests
(p.19)
67th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, 25.06.2017 - 30.06.2017, Lindau, Germany, Lecture Bernard Feringa, Picture/Credit: Julia Nimke/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Science & Technology

More than 20 prize-winning scientists gathered last month in Lindau to share their views on research and life
(pp. 26-27)
C&EN’s curated list of things to do, people to see, and science to learn
(pp. 30-31)
Scientists are still uncovering all the players that help keep proteins folded inside cells—and all the ways the process can go wrong
(pp. 32-38)
Affected plants use dodder’s vasculature to send out alerts for defending against insect pests
(p.10)
Two research groups prepare the first examples of azadiphospholides and azatriphospholenes
(pp. 10-11)
Procedure leads to patterned thin films of metals, semiconductors, and oxides without the need for organic photoresists
(p.10)
Researchers engineer stem cells that convert a prodrug into an active drug when they encounter stiff, metastasizing tumor tissue
(p.11)
Variations of an important metabolic protein may explain why baleen whales are so gigantic
(p.11)
3-D printed device uses an infrared sensor to make measurements from the eardrum, also acts as a hearing aid
(p.11)
Hilos de oligoprolina que se autoensamblan para formar una estructura trenzada
(p.5)

Editor's Page

Letters

(p.3)