Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society
 

December 4, 2017 Issue

Volume 95, Issue 48
09548-cover1-hourglass
December 4, 2017 Issue, Vol. 95 | Iss. 48
Trump’s tweets, therapeutic T cells, and a turning point for gene therapy were just a few topics that made headlines in 2017
By
(p.33)
Features
Government & Policy
EPA embraces new era in risk assessment (pp. 18-19)
Education
Caltech and Stanford plan to drop ABET to modernize their curricula and offer students more flexibility, but others still see value in the standards (pp. 20-22)
Back Issues
 
Pharma navigates a new Administration
Empty threats and promises from Trump left drugmakers grappling with uncertainty
(p.34)
New FDA chief got good marks for his first months
Industry insiders say Gottlieb is good for innovation
(p.35)
A whirlwind year for the drug industry
Against the backdrop of a rising biotech stock index, the pharmaceutical industry in 2017 juggled an unpredictable new Administration, breathtaking technological advances, modest deal-making, and the never ending conversation about drug prices
(pp. 36-37)
Gene therapy came of age
FDA is expected to approve the first gene therapy, a treatment for a genetic form of blindness, in the U.S. early next year
(p.36)
Pharma M&A on pace to hit industry’s ‘new normal’
Industry watchers say activity could pick up in 2018
(p.39)
The opioid crisis
As drug deaths soared, FDA made tough decisions on painkillers
(p.40)
Another strong year for early-stage biotech investment
Lofty biotech launches covered CRISPR, the microbiome, and more
(p.41)
The spotlight was on drug prices, again
Pressure to lower costs ratcheted up as expensive treatments proliferate
(p.42)
Notable drug failures in 2017
Clinical trial failures come with the territory, but late-stage setbacks can have a profound impact on companies and patients
(p.43)
CAR-T cancer immunotherapy took off
Two personalized immune-cell therapies came to the market, and more are likely on the way
(p.44)
 

News of the Week

Chemists engineer bacteria to use unnatural DNA bases to make unnatural proteins

Living microorganisms transcribe and translate DNA with six bases instead of the usual four
(p.5)

Azides safely used to synthesize diamines

Industry-academic team develops a mild, scaled-up method for handling hazardous reagents to produce key chemical intermediates
(p.6)

Modified sponge mops up oil but not water

Watch a video of the oil-mopping sponge in action at cenm.ag/oilwatersponge
(p.6)

Chemists synthesize longest polycatenane to date

String of 26 mechanically interlocked rings breaks record
(p.7)

Hormones could help explain lower rates of asthma in men

Testosterone keeps inflammation-inducing lung cells in check, study shows
(p.9)

Aramco and SABIC advance oil-to-chemicals

The large plant will deepen Aramco’s involvement with the chemical industry
(p.12)

AstraZeneca to spin off Shanghai R&D

Move follows reduction in China research footprint by other big drug firms
(p.12)

Merck and Qiagen to expand in U.K.

Investments come as British government seeks more life science investment
(p.13)

Toray admits subsidiary faked data

Giant materials supplier is the latest caught falsifying quality controls
(p.13)

Glyphosate renewed for five years in the EU

Surprise decision by Germany swings vote in favor of reapproval of controversial herbicide
(p.16)

U.S. FDA wants more generic drug-device combos

Agency will outline ways for generic drug developers to gain approval for copycat inhalers and autoinjectors, commissioner says
(p.16)

Graduate students protest U.S. tax plan

Proposal to make tuition taxable could make students pay thousands more each year
(p.17)
 

Departments

09548-bus-sitecxd-new

Business

Legendary Experimental Station now hosts an effort to bring in outsider technology and foster an entrepreneurial spirit
(pp. 24-25)
Empty threats and promises from Trump left drugmakers grappling with uncertainty
(p.34)
Industry insiders say Gottlieb is good for innovation
(p.35)
Pressure to lower costs ratcheted up as expensive treatments proliferate
(p.42)
As drug deaths soared, FDA made tough decisions on painkillers
(p.40)
FDA is expected to approve the first gene therapy, a treatment for a genetic form of blindness, in the U.S. early next year
(p.36)
Two personalized immune-cell therapies came to the market, and more are likely on the way
(p.44)
Clinical trial failures come with the territory, but late-stage setbacks can have a profound impact on companies and patients
(p.43)
Industry watchers say activity could pick up in 2018
(p.39)
Trump’s tweets, therapeutic T cells, and a turning point for gene therapy were just a few topics that made headlines in 2017
(p.33)
Lofty biotech launches covered CRISPR, the microbiome, and more
(p.41)
Against the backdrop of a rising biotech stock index, the pharmaceutical industry in 2017 juggled an unpredictable new Administration, breathtaking technological advances, modest deal-making, and the never ending conversation about drug prices
(pp. 36-37)
09548-govpol-simmons-new

Government & Policy

EPA embraces new era in risk assessment
(pp. 18-19)

Education

Caltech and Stanford plan to drop ABET to modernize their curricula and offer students more flexibility, but others still see value in the standards
(pp. 20-22)
For some, the connections they make at the annual meeting will propel them forward in their careers
(pp. 28-30)
09548-scitech2-goelitzcxd-new

Science & Technology

Peter Gölitz looks back on his career as editor in chief of Angewandte Chemie
(pp. 26-27)
Cells engineered with cytochrome c enzyme forge carbon-boron bonds
(p.10)
Bacteria-laden hydrogels with functional properties can be used to make structures for bioremediation and biomedical applications
(p.11)
New material could improve the resolution of fingerprint patterns detected at crime scenes
(p.10)
Tightly tiled square plates create a mirror to concentrate light on the mollusk’s retina
(p.11)
A calcium hydride reagent mediates the improbable attack of an alkyl nucleophile on an electron-rich aromatic ring
(p.11)
Low oxygen levels trigger a switch from N-oxide to aniline, with an observable spectral signature
(p.10)

Career & Employment

Newscripts

Letters

(pp. 3-4)