Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society
 

September 18, 2017 Issue

Volume 95, Issue 37
09537-cover-quote-new
September 18, 2017 Issue, Vol. 95 | Iss. 37
Awareness is growing among academic departments and scientific societies about the potential damage to individuals and the discipline
By Linda Wang
(pp. 28-37)
Features
Science & Technology
DNA profiling methods have become faster, more sensitive, and more user-friendly since the first murderer was caught with help from genetic evidence (pp. 16-20)
Business
European materials firms take positions as electric car adoption accelerates (pp. 21-23)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Quantum computing goes beyond hydrogen and helium

IBM system calculates ground states of lithium hydride and beryllium hydride
(p.4)

Gold nanoparticles form mirror that can be switched on and off

Metamaterial device reversibly changes its optical properties in response to voltage changes
(p.5)

Mother’s gut microbes could be linked to autismlike disorders in children

Presence of certain bacteria in pregnant mice lead to abnormal brain wiring and autismlike behaviors in offspring
(p.5)

Doubts raised over validity of CRISPR-edited human embryo study

In bioRxiv paper, embryologists and geneticists question whether gene repair could have occurred as reported
(p.6)

Hurricane Irma upends university operations

Miami-area schools closed for more than two weeks as others reopened
(p.6)

Enzyme coordinates pericyclic reaction trifecta

LepI catalyzes three concerted rearrangements en route to the natural insecticide leporin C
(p.7)

Goodenough wins 2017 Welch Award

Texas researcher recognized for pioneering work in lithium-ion batteries
(p.7)

DNA robot sorts and delivers

Nucleic acid construct picks up, moves, and drops off fluorescent cargo to predetermined locations
(p.8)

Electronics take shape

A mechanically active ink allows flat, 3-D-printed electronic components to spontaneously fold
(p.8)

Allergan seeks tribe’s help in patent dispute

Dry-eye drug is at the center of a novel maneuver to squash generic competition
(p.10)

First responders sue Arkema

Seven emergency personnel claim Texas chemical fire resulted in injury from toxic fumes
(p.10)

DowDuPont amends split plan

Wilmington-based specialty products firm will be much larger under new breakup scheme
(p.11)

FDA’s Gottlieb wants drug pricing and drug development costs to come down

The FDA aims to modernize data collection and evaluation of drug trials
(p.14)

U.S. Congress scrutinizes over-the-counter drugs

Draft bipartisan legislation would overhaul how FDA regulates nonprescription products
(p.14)

Chemist nominated to lead the U.S. National Institute of Standards & Technology

Copan spent years in industry and in government
(p.15)

U.S. ag chemicals makers back controversial Trump nominee

Democrats oppose Clovis for USDA science job
(p.15)
 

Departments

LN-goodenough-new

Science & Technology

Molecular biologist Jonathan Scheiman studies the gut flora of elite athletes to understand what makes them unique
(pp. 26-27)
Researchers design nonconventional monomers that enhance the optical and electronic properties of conjugated materials
(pp. 24-25)
DNA profiling methods have become faster, more sensitive, and more user-friendly since the first murderer was caught with help from genetic evidence
(pp. 16-20)
Chemists find that a palladium cyclopropenium complex reported in 1964 has a more complex structure than originally thought
(p.9)
Injected microparticles release contents at preprogrammed dosage times on the basis of polymer composition
(p.9)
Technique makes ‘functional’ cotton fibers without genetic engineering
(p.9)
Un sistema de IBM calcula el estado fundamental del hidruro de litio y el hidruro de berilio
(p.4)

Career & Employment

Awareness is growing among academic departments and scientific societies about the potential damage to individuals and the discipline
(pp. 28-37)

Newscripts

Editor's Page

Letters

(p.3)