Copyright © 2016 American Chemical Society
 

April 11, 2016 Issue

Volume 94, Issue 15
09415-cov-cover
April 11, 2016 Issue, Vol. 94 | Iss. 15
Could low-cost manufacturing techniques finally broaden commercial adoption of the two-dimensional material?
By Alex Scott
(pp. 28-33)
Features
Science & Technology
Various methods can identify triacetone triperoxide—but only if they can get a close look at the container where it’s hiding (pp. 17-18)
Science & Technology
Personality, politics, death, and bad luck explain why the prize eluded these chemistry pioneers (pp. 19-21)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Tax rules kill Pfizer-Allergan merger deal

Record-setting combination doomed by loss of favorable tax treatment
(p.3)

At last, scientists solve structure of protein that antidepressants target

Serotonin transporter structure could provide map for discovering new therapeutics for depression
(p.4)

New record for longest linear carbon chain

Researchers say it’s the closest approximation yet achieved of carbyne, an elusive and controversial material
(p.4)

Comet collisions may have helped seed life on Earth, lab experiment shows

Researchers produce ribose—a sugar important to sustaining life—in the icy conditions experienced by comets in outer space
(pp. 6-8)

Toxic biocides may not be needed routinely at fracking sites, study shows

Tests find that some fracking sites don’t contain pipeline-fouling microbes
(p.6)

Ceramic-graphene composite shows promise as battery electrode

Material combines silicon oxycarbide’s large capacity for storing lithium and graphene’s high electrical conductivity
(p.7)

Researchers watch biomolecules fold

Force spectroscopy enables first direct observations of folding transition paths
(p.7)

Gilead buys Nimbus’s NASH portfolio

$400 million deal adds ACC inhibitors to Gilead’s liver disease pipeline
(p.10)

Johnson & Johnson launches global health strategy

The firm aims to build scientific capacity while improving access to health care in South Africa
(p.10)

3-D printing start-up Carbon unveils its first printer

Company announces its M1 printer along with custom photosensitive resins
(p.11)

Air Products retreats from waste-to-energy

Shutting its new U.K. facility could cost the company $1 billion
(p.12)

FDA targets arsenic in baby cereal

Agency moves to reduce harmful levels of contaminant in infant rice cereal
(p.15)

PubMed and conflicts of interest

U.S. senators want the database to provide funding sources with article abstracts
(p.15)

U.S. Senate passes bill to combat theft of trade secrets

Legislation would give victimized companies recourse in federal court
(p.15)
 

Departments

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Science & Technology

Various methods can identify triacetone triperoxide—but only if they can get a close look at the container where it’s hiding
(pp. 17-18)
First-time disclosures symposium spotlights the process of developing clinical candidates
(pp. 22-23)
Personality, politics, death, and bad luck explain why the prize eluded these chemistry pioneers
(pp. 19-21)
Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning explains why April showers roll off of raincoats and treated windshields
(p.27)
La estructura del transportador de la serotonina podría ser la clave en el descubrimiento de nuevas terapias contra la depresión
(p.4)
El profesor de Química y bloguero de Compound Interest Andy Brunning explica por qué las lluvias de abril dan paso a los chubasqueros y a los recubrimientos de parabrisas
(p.27)

Newscripts