March 23, 2015 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
Copyright © 2015 American Chemical Society
 

March 23, 2015 Issue

Volume 93, Issue 12
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March 23, 2015 Issue, Vol. 93 | Iss. 12
ACS lauds Barton for discovering fast, long-range electron transport in DNA as well as infectious enthusiasm for the chemistry enterprise
By Jyllian Kemsley
(pp. 11-14)
Features
Business
Whether polystyrene foam can be effectively recycled is at the heart of a battle between New York City and industry (pp. 23-25)
Government & Policy
Fight focuses on whether Congress should give President negotiation authority (pp. 29-31)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Chemistry Is Key To 3-D Printer’s Record-Setting Speed

Manufacturing: New machine uses photocurable resins to cut print times from hours to minutes
(p.5)

DSM Strikes A Deal With CVC For Polymer Intermediates Business


Dutch firm furthers transformation by forming new company with investment firm CVC

(p.6)

Graphene Defects Help Transfer Protons

Materials: Atomic-scale imperfections act like a bucket line, passing protons through the material
(p.6)

Budget Conflict Ramps Up

Congress: Republicans seek tighter federal budgets that could curb research spending
(p.7)

Cough Suppressant Tames Type 2 Diabetes

Medicinal Chemistry: Ingredient in over-the-counter medicine blocks receptor on insulin-producing pancreatic cells
(p.7)

NIH Launches Competition For A Better Alcohol Biosensor

With cash prize, agency hopes to spur development of a less obtrusive device for monitoring alcohol consumption
(p.8)

Red Rock’s Jet Fuel From Wood Gets Lift

Biofuels: Startup company hopes to succeed where others have failed
(p.8)

Targeting Brain Metabolism Could Offer New Way To Treat Epilepsy

Neuroscience: Inhibiting lactate dehydrogenase in mouse brains calms overexcited neurons and suppresses seizures
(p.9)
 

Departments

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Science & Technology

ACS lauds Barton for discovering fast, long-range electron transport in DNA as well as infectious enthusiasm for the chemistry enterprise
(pp. 11-14)
These toys are popular in classrooms and on desktops because of their logic-defying properties
(p.41)
Chemists look for new biological probes by synthesizing a library of more than 10,000 fluorescent molecules
(pp. 39-40)

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