November 6, 2017 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society
 

November 6, 2017 Issue

Volume 95, Issue 44
09544-cover1-legoW
November 6, 2017 Issue, Vol. 95 | Iss. 44
Meet the master builders behind the chemistry’s most intriguing young companies
By Business Department
(pp. 30-31)
Features
Education
Number of U.S. chemistry faculty from underrepresented groups remains stagnant, OXIDE survey shows (pp. 18-20)
Science & Technology
Despite a setback in developing injection-free delivery methods, some strategies are showing promise (pp. 21-22)
Back Issues
 
The classes of 2015 and 2016: Where are they now?
C&EN’s Start-Ups to Watch had an exciting year
Exscientia
Artificial intelligence cuts costs and speeds up drug discovery and design
(p.6)
Light Polymers
Lyotropic liquid crystals for lighting and displays
(p.7)
Arrakis Therapeutics
Targeting RNA with small-molecule drugs
(p.32)
Boragen
Protecting plants with shape-shifting boron molecules
(p.33)
Citrine Informatics
Taking artificial intelligence to the materials research lab
(p.34)
Ecovia Renewables
A new approach to designing biotransformations
(p.35)
P2 Science
Connecticut-based start-up seeks to make ozonolysis safe for manufacturing
(p.38)
Relay Therapeutics
Probing protein motion to tackle tough drug targets
(p.39)
Solid Power
Developing solid electrolytes for safer, high-energy batteries
(p.40)
Two Pore Guys
Handheld nanopore sensor rivals accuracy of lab equipment
(p.41)
 

News of the Week

Bonnie Charpentier is 2018 ACS president-elect

4 other board director positions also filled
(p.5)

Tetrapetalones yield to total synthesis at last

After researchers try for more than a decade, one team succeeds in creating the complex natural products
(p.7)

Mussels’ iron grip inspires strong and stretchy polymer

Iron-catechol cross-links used by the seafood favorite to cling to rocks help chemists create innovative material
(p.8)

Baking soda washes pesticides from apples

Alkaline solution wipes out residues on the fruits’ surface but leaves some behind in their peels, study shows
(p.9)

Nanotextured glass becomes 'invisible'

Etching nanoscale patterns into glass gives it antireflective properties
(p.9)

DowDuPont leads a strong third quarter

Robust demand helped U.S. industry shrug off hurricane impacts
(p.12)

Clariant and Huntsman nix $20 billion deal

Activist shareholder keeps up pressure after scuttling the transaction
(p.13)

Kymera launches with $30 million to tackle targeted protein degradation

Backed by Atlas Venture, the firm hopes to put its first compound in the clinic by 2020
(p.13)

EU focuses its research funding

Commission unveils priorities for 2018 through 2020
(p.16)

Grant recipients barred as U.S. EPA advisers

Agency chief makes room for more industry scientists
(p.16)
 

Departments

09544-cover1-legoW-new

Business

C&EN’s Start-Ups to Watch had an exciting year
Artificial intelligence cuts costs and speeds up drug discovery and design
(p.6)
Probing protein motion to tackle tough drug targets
(p.39)
Targeting RNA with small-molecule drugs
(p.32)
Lyotropic liquid crystals for lighting and displays
(p.7)
Protecting plants with shape-shifting boron molecules
(p.33)
Connecticut-based start-up seeks to make ozonolysis safe for manufacturing
(p.38)
Handheld nanopore sensor rivals accuracy of lab equipment
(p.41)
Meet the master builders behind the chemistry’s most intriguing young companies
(pp. 30-31)
Developing solid electrolytes for safer, high-energy batteries
(p.40)
Taking artificial intelligence to the materials research lab
(p.34)
A new approach to designing biotransformations
(p.35)

Education

Number of U.S. chemistry faculty from underrepresented groups remains stagnant, OXIDE survey shows
(pp. 18-20)
09544-scitech1-vaccinecxd-new

Science & Technology

Despite a setback in developing injection-free delivery methods, some strategies are showing promise
(pp. 21-22)
Simple process converts MOF in invisible ink to luminescent nanocrystals, providing reversible invisibility
(p.10)
Method preserves and reveals structure and composition details obscured by standard microscopy methods
(p.10)
Carbohydrate screening array has 60 synthesized glycans representative of those on TB surface
(pp. 10-11)
Study shows comparatively unstable antiaromatic molecules can work well in molecular electronic devices
(p.11)
Material could be used for cathodes in lithium-ion batteries
(p.11)
Two education advocates say research-experience programs are critical for driving innovation and economic competitiveness
(pp. 24-25)
Scientists are pushing chemistry to help us go faster, farther, deeper, and higher.
(pp. 26-28)

Career & Employment

This chemist made the leap into biotech, then entrepreneurship and beyond
(p.23)

Editor's Page

Letters

(pp. 3-4)