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October 15, 2018 Issue

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October 15, 2018 Cover

Volume 96, Issue 41

Water-from-air technologies use science to squeeze water from the atmosphere

Cover:Two men stand beside an apparatus made of vertically aligned metal wires.

Credit: Peter Means | Jonathan Boreyko (left) and Brook Kennedy test a meter-sized version of their fog harp.

Full Article
Volume 96 | Issue 41

All Issues

Can stripping the air of its moisture quench the world’s thirst?

Water-from-air technologies use science to squeeze water from the atmosphere

  • Is your adviser a micromanager? When to take your experiment undercover

    Chemjobber weighs the pros and cons of doing your science in stealth

  • Periodic Graphics: The chemistry of Venus flytraps

    Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning highlights the molecules exploited by the carnivorous plant to lure, catch, and digest its prey

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Polymers

This self-healing material proves the power of weak van der Waals interactions

The co-polymer, made from two popular monomers, doesn’t need any intervention to fix itself when scratched or severed

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